Abortion In Salman Rushdie Essay

Abortion In Salman Rushdie Essay-47
History—and the pressures of the past—is his great theme; but he is also a plaything of history.It has used him in its story; it has made him seem like a character out of a Salman Rushdie novel, the creation of an imagination no less outlandish than his own.Aatish Taseer: I’m convinced I just saw one of your characters go by in the garden. Yes, but it was also that my parents had recently—to my mind, mistakenly—moved to Karachi. But I’ve always thought the thing that has a hold on me is cities more than countries. What was it like to be in a place like America that is almost willfully ahistorical?

History—and the pressures of the past—is his great theme; but he is also a plaything of history.It has used him in its story; it has made him seem like a character out of a Salman Rushdie novel, the creation of an imagination no less outlandish than his own.Aatish Taseer: I’m convinced I just saw one of your characters go by in the garden. Yes, but it was also that my parents had recently—to my mind, mistakenly—moved to Karachi. But I’ve always thought the thing that has a hold on me is cities more than countries. What was it like to be in a place like America that is almost willfully ahistorical?

Because—mortifying as it seems to me even now—I asked Salman Rushdie if he was not by any chance Salman, my father.

My mother looked aghast; God knows what Rushdie must have made of this peculiar mother and son duo.

I was living the louche life in London, paddling in the shallows of café society, while dreaming all the time of being a writer myself. Rushdie was dancing in a circle with Orlando Bloom and the erstwhile leader of the Soviet Union. A few months before, my father, the man I had mistaken Rushdie for, and now Governor of Punjab, had been shot dead by his own bodyguard.

One night at Althorp, the seat of Earl Spencer, at a party given by a Russian oligarch for Mikhail Gorbachev, I caught a glimpse of Rushdie. He was defending a poor Christian woman accused of blasphemy, and Pakistan being Pakistan, he came himself to be a blasphemer, his killer a hero. It was what they had accused Rushdie of all those years ago, and to meet him in Delhi, against the background of this new time, was to feel a circle of synchronicity was complete.

He, along with his wife, Alba, are the dedicatees of Rushdie’s new novel.

As I’m awaiting Rushdie’s arrival, with a cold six-pack of a Belgian IPA called Raging Bitch, Clemente texts to say he cannot be there.

I’ve always thought that if my parents had still been living in our house in Bombay that I would have gone back, and I would just have continued there. I think I would have just gone back there, and seen what I could do. Because after some time of living in the West, I became quite aware of this probability, or the possibility, of losing touch with where I come from, especially since my family was not living there anymore. Anyway, I kind of fell in love with it, partly because it was very youthful. you kind of fell in love with that too, didn’t you? And, in the same way, I felt a sense of belonging in London… You say that, but unlike certain writers, who write in very small ways about cities, you inhale countries. And there’s plenty of America that I don’t feel I would be at all at home in. In your final year in Cambridge, in a history degree, you do three special subjects. And the three that I chose have in their own way ended up being very significant in my life: One was Indian history from 1857-1947, that was one.

Did you feel at that point that India was a place where you could make a go at being a writer? Less difficult now, because there is more of a literary milieu than there used to be. But I felt deeply rooted in Bombay, and as far as I was concerned going to school [in England] had been an unhappy experience, going to university had been a much happier experience… And had they not done this strange thing of moving so late… But given the choice between Karachi and London, I felt much more at home in London than in Pakistan, where I’d never lived. And I didn’t like that feeling, so writing that book was in a way an effort at reclaiming that past. New York in those days, because it was so cheap, was around here full of young artists. But, for me, with children in London and so on, LA was not really an option. And so, we sort of agreed that we would base ourselves in New York. The second was: Muhammad, and the rise of Islam, the early caliphate.

The house whose garden we are sitting in once belonged to Bob Dylan.

It has, now for many years, belonged to our mutual friend the painter Francesco Clemente.

SHOW COMMENTS

Comments Abortion In Salman Rushdie Essay

The Latest from www.gatsport3.ru ©