Homework Plan

To get the most out of your calendar, include everything — from basketball practice on Mondays to the reading log every night so you both can plan realistically.If you know which nights are going to be a problem, “Ask for the week’s assignments at once and figure out your own schedule for completing them,” suggests Dr. “Teachers will often work with you on this, but most parents are afraid to ask.” 10.Let ’Em Vent: Best for Everyone When your routine is upended — and your kid hasn’t even started his homework — ease frustration by letting him complain. You can help your child by talking to her about what she remembers from class and steering her to the textbook.

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“I let one kid at a time use my office if they are having trouble,” says Jennifer Harrison, of Sacramento, CA, mom of a 7- and an 11-year-old.

“Being in the spot where Mom does grown-up work seems to help them focus. ” or “This sentence is even better than the one you came up with yesterday!

Maybe because I tell them that it’s my place to concentrate.” 6. ” If you praise specific improvements, your little learner will become more inclined to try to do a good job the first time around. Leave the Room: Best for Whiners “Kids who drag things out are often doing so for your attention — they’re enjoying the interaction on some level,” explains Grace. And if you must stay in the room, have your child work in a spot that’s farther away from whatever you’re doing.” 8.

Keep the Positive Feedback Coming: Best for the K–2 Set Little kids need instant feedback, so it’s okay for parents of young grade-schoolers to correct mistakes, says Grace. After he’s finished, take his paper and say “Hmm, I’m looking for something . Beat the Clock: Best for Procrastinators Sometimes a pint-size foot dragger just needs a jump-start.

If your kid’s teacher doesn’t, show your child how to “scaffold” the assignment yourself, says Dr. Together, divide the project into steps, then help her estimate how much time each will take.

Get a weekly or monthly calendar, and then write down which steps she’ll tackle when — and for how long.

If that’s true for yours, try Dolin’s “Five Minutes of Fury”: Set a timer for five minutes, shout “Go!

” and have your child work as fast as she can until the timer goes off.

Ed., a former teacher and author of Homework Made Simple.

The study buddy can read your child the spelling words over the phone, or his mom can snap a pic of the worksheet and text it to you. Build Confidence: Best for the Intimidated When kids don’t get something right away, they may feel like they’re stupid and start to shut down, says Sigrid Grace, a second-grade teacher in Almont, MI, and a member of Scholastic Parent & Child’s advisory board.

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